Gateway Rehab Applauds FDA for Breakthrough Thinking in Alcoholism Treatment

alcoholism, drinking alcoholThis February, the FDA suggested new guidelines for drug makers interested in developing treatments for alcoholism. In a groundbreaking departure from conventional thinking, the guidelines would give drug companies the green light to develop treatments that help patients stay within “low-risk” daily alcohol limits.

Presently, the goal of pharmaceutical treatments for alcoholism is total abstinence from drinking alcohol.

In a February 11 bloomberg.com post, FDA spokesman Eric Pahon explained that abstinence-based endpoints are often unattainable in a clinical trial, which can hinder the development of drugs to treat alcoholism. “Reducing heavy drinking to within ‘low-risk’ daily limits presents an alternative goal in drug development so more treatments may be developed,” Pahon said.

John Larson, M.D., Corporate Medical Director of Gateway Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers, agrees. “While complete avoidance of alcohol is necessary for some to achieve meaningful recovery, there are others whose lives could greatly benefit from treatment that successfully reduces the amount and frequency of alcohol use without requiring total abstinence. These new FDA guidelines could aid in the discovery of whole new categories of medications that could do just that,” said Dr. Larson.

The Need for New Medications

There are currently three categories of drugs sold to treat alcoholism. In addition to having limitations, these medications are only effective for some.

Despite this, no new medications have been introduced into the alcohol treatment market in nearly ten years. Reaching the high bar of total sobriety in a clinical trial consistently proves elusive.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) acknowledges more medications are needed to serve the broader population. Dr. Raye Litten, associate director of the agency’s Division of Treatment and Recovery Research, believes more treatments will enable more patients to find one that works for them.

The FDA proposal identifies alcoholism as continued drinking despite physical and psychosocial consequences. The agency said an alcoholism drug should ultimately improve those consequences, which can be done via total sobriety or a reduction in alcohol use.

Michael Darcy, Gateway’s CEO & President, backs this thinking. He said, “It seems the substance abuse disorder field is the only profession that claims a 100% rate of no relapses as the criteria for success. I hope this (new) notion will lead to a more realistic view of success.”

To learn more about treatment options for alcohol abuse issues, or our free, confidential consultation, call Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers today at 877-505-HOPE (4673).

The Irony of Drug and Alcohol Addiction

alcohol addiction substance abuseNearly one in 10 American adults and teens has a drug or alcohol abuse problem; and sadly, only one in 10 Americans who need help with substance abuse issues will seek professional treatment.

Prolonged exposure to alcohol and drugs alters the brain in ways that result in powerful cravings and a compulsion to use. These brain changes make it extremely difficult to quit using by sheer force of will. But that doesn’t mean someone with addiction issues is a helpless victim.

The good news is: Brain changes associated with addiction can be treated and reversed through engaging in therapy and other treatments, taking appropriate medication as prescribed, and leading a healthy, sober lifestyle.

Click to View Gateway's Roadmap to Understanding Substance Abuse: A Guide for Parents and Families

Click to View Gateway’s Roadmap to Understanding Substance Abuse: A Guide for Parents and Families

So, if addiction can be successfully treated, why are roughly 90 percent of Americans ignoring their issues with alcohol and/or drug dependency? Tragically, that’s the irony of addiction.

There are major hurdles to overcome before people acknowledge they are ready for substance abuse treatment. Denial, stigma, aversion to change, understanding treatment options, and cost of care are just a few.

But there is hope. The Affordable Care Act now makes substance abuse treatment accessible to more people through their insurance benefits. And effective outpatient treatment allows adults to continue working while receiving treatment.

For more information, visit RecoverGateway.org/Roadmap to get a free copy of our new family and parent guide, “Roadmap to Understanding Substance Abuse.”

Gateway Aurora Executive Director Collaborates with Daily Herald to Educate Community on Heroin Addiction Treatment

heroin addiciton treatmetn

Video produced and distributed by Daily Herald

Jim Scarpace, Executive Director, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers in Aurora, IL recently provided the Daily Herald with information regarding heroin addiction treatment.

Scarpace said, “With heroin, you’re always trying to chase that initial high that you could never re-create. In treatment, you learn the skill to manage the distorted behaviors associated with addiction…Treatment isn’t magic, but give it time, and it can work.”

“Treatment is a lifelong process,” Scarpace says. “If treatment was a magic bullet, we wouldn’t have these issues we’re having [with heroin abuse in our community].”1

Read the full article from the Daily Herald at dailyherald.com.

Learn more about heroin addiction treatment at RecoverGateway.org/Heroin or call our 24-Hour Helpline at 877-505-HOPE (4673)

1 http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20150125/news/150129178/

Springfield Gateway Event Focuses on Re-entering the Workplace Following Substance Abuse Treatment

drug rehab, Gateway Springfield, Alcohol & Drug Treatment

Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment in Springfield

Forty people gathered for food, fellowship and information at a January 21st alumni event sponsored by Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment in Springfield. The no-cost event featured guest speakers on the topic of workplace re-entry following substance abuse treatment.

Attendees gained valuable insight on the pertinent topics of Self-care and Perseverance, presented by alumna Jamie B; and Resume, Application and Interview Tips offered by Springfield Gateway’s Tammy Kmett.

The gathering, which included food and giveaways, was attended by 19 Gateway alumni and 14 current residents. Gateway Springfield employees present were Julie Pena, Alumni Specialist; Amy Taylor, OP Counsellor II; and speaker, Tammy Kmett, Patient Financial Counselor.

The two-hour alumni event was held from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Gateway Springfield, 2200 Lake Victoria Drive.

Gateway Springfield provides substance abuse treatment services for teens and adults. With centers located throughout Illinois and the St. Louis East Metro area, Gateway’s professional clinicians have facilitated the successful completion of treatment for thousands of individuals.

Learn more about Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers by calling 877-505-HOPE (4673).

%d bloggers like this: