Pekin Community Unite to ‘Fight the Fight’ Against Addiction with TWO Events

Please join members of the Pekin Community on Sunday, August 7th in the first annual ‘Fight the Fight’ Addiction Awareness Walk at Mineral Springs Park in Pekin, IL. The walk is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and does not require registration. All community members are invited.

iStock_000022659105SmallThis short, scenic walk will be accompanied by speakers on the to pics of recovery, the
disease of addiction, Narcan and harm reduction, a coroner’s report  and more. Speakers include those who have lost their loved ones to addiction, individuals in recovery, Gateway Treatment Centers, Tazewell County Coroner, Pekin Police Department and more. A short “fight song” will  be performed while balloons are released to honor and remember those who lost their battle with addiction.

Gateway Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers and JM Industrial Supply are the Gold Level sponsors of this walk.

Following the walk, Gateway invites all community members to visit the Pekin treatment center and enjoy light snacks and refreshments from 4:30pm-6:30pm. Gateway’s substance abuse treatment experts will be available to answer questions about drug and alcohol abuse and treatment options available. Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers would like to extend a special thank you to our local Hyvee and Panera Bread for their generous donations towards the open house event immediately following the awareness walk.

The Fight the Fight group was formed in 2016 by a local family who lost their son to a heroin overdose. In an effort to help others struggling with addiction, the family aims to bring awareness to addiction and treatment options.

To learn more about heroin abuse and treatment options visit RecoverGateway.org

Lurie Children’s Hospital Cautions Parents of the Dangers of Teen Binge Drinking at Lollapalooza

iStock_46778544_SMALL.jpgThis weekend kicks off the annual music festival in ChicagoLollapalooza. While popular for its music, it is also a popular event for teen drinking. Nearly 100 teenagers were treated for alcohol poisoning during this event last year.

At Lurie Children’s Hospital, doctors and nurses push a young woman on a stretcher down a hall as she demonstrates expected behavior from a typical teenage patient who is intoxicated: mumbling and crying, as well as vomiting and dehydration. It may be a common sight starting on July 28 when Lollapalooza comes to town.

“We have to staff the ER with higher numbers. We need a lot more acute care for these children,” says Dr. Nina Arfieri.

The patient, Gabi Sel, is actually a hospital intern who is helping with the drill so that staff can be better prepared for when real patients come. And they will come; according to a hospital study, in 2015 Lollapalooza weekend saw hospitals receiving more intoxicated patients than the next three busiest weekends of the year combined.

Nurses are going over the protocol for handling those patients. For her part, Gabi is glad this is only a drill.

“Being in this bed is very scary and it feels very real when you’re in it, even if it’s just a scene,” she says.

The study finds that the majority of patients are 16 to 18 years old, female and from the suburbs. But the authors of the study say they’re not trying to discourage people from going to Lollapalooza.

“I think it’s important for kids to go out and enjoy music, and get outside, but I think there’s a safe way to do it, and I think we can do this without having them risk their lives,” says Dr. Arfieri.

The news isn’t all bad though: the study found the number of teenagers going to the emergency room for intoxication dropped significantly in 2015 compared to 2014. Doctors are hoping that trend continues.

TALKING TO TEENS ABOUT DRINKING AND DRUG USE

In honor of “Purposeful Parenting Month” in July, and with Chicago’s Lollapalooza right around the corner, take a moment to talk to your teen about the dangers of drinking and drug use. At Gateway, we know starting this conversation isn’t always easy. Use the Parent Tools Below to help you start the conversation about binge drinking and teen drug use.

PARENT TOOLS FROM GATEWAY ALCOHOL AND DRUG TREATMENT CENTERS:

Still have questions? Gateway has answers. Learn more about teen substance abuse by downloading our free resource guide at Recovergateway.org/teens or call 877-505-HOPE (4673).

 

July is Purposeful Parenting Month

 

teens-drugs-alcoholPurposeful parenting is being an active, engaged parent who strives to give their child the best life possible. Purposeful parenting is also about building strong, positive, functional families and recognizing the importance of meaningful relationships between parents and children.

This July, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers, aims to highlight some tips you can use to talk to your child about drug and alcohol use. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, starting the conversation isn’t always easy, but research suggests that the majority of teens – around 80% – feel parents should have a say in whether they drink alcohol.

A PARENT CHECKLIST FOR TALKING TO TEENS ABOUT DRUGS AND ALCOHOL

  • ENCOURAGE OPEN DIALOGUE

If you’ve been talking to your child openly throughout the years then you’ve formed a solid foundation for an open dialogue. However, as your child matures even the most communicative child can close up. It’s up to you to keep the lines of communication open and non-judgmental.

  • SET ASIDE ONE-ON-ONE BONDING TIME

Sometimes your child needs to be reminded despite the preoccupations of everyday life for the both of you – work, school, after-school functions, siblings and family obligations – he or she still matters and is being listened to. Try to get some one-on-one time with each of your children.

  • JUST LISTEN

When you talk with your child about drinking and drug use, listen and respect what they have to say. These are conversations you’ll want to have many times over the years and if they shut down initially, it may be more difficult to get them to open up later.

  • DISCUSS DRUGS AND ALCOHOL IN A WAY THAT REFLECTS THE IMPORTANCE OF THE TOPIC

A quick chat in between texts or on the drive to soccer practice may not be sufficient to signal the gravity and importance of drug abuse. We know it’s hard to find the right time to have a conversation with your children, but this is an important message to share.

  • SET CLEAR EXPECTATIONS

Make clear your expectations to your child – that drinking and using drugs is unacceptable. Let them know your expectations will be enforced.

For more information, download our Free Guide to Understanding Drug and Alcohol Abuse at www.RecoverGateway.org/Teens.

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