The Relationship of Substance Use Disorder and Mental Illness

suicide and substance abuse, gateway treatment centersAt Gateway, we recognize that mental illness and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) often coincide. In fact, the presence of a co-occurring diagnosis is more the “rule” than the exception. The terms “dual diagnosis” or “co-occurring” refer to an individual that is affected by two or more disorders or illnesses.

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports that 37% of individuals with alcohol use disorder and 53% of those with a drug use disorder also have at least one serious mental illness.

It is difficult to diagnose which came first – the SUD or the mental health disorder. Drug use can cause one to experience symptoms of mental illness. However, mental illness can also lead to drug use as a form of self-medication to manage symptoms. There are many overlapping factors that can make it difficult to detect the initial issue.

“There is no question that no matter which came first; both issues need to be addressed in treatment,” said Katie Stout, Executive Director at Gateway. According to reports from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the most common reason for relapse is an untreated mental health problem.

“The best chance of recovery is through an integrated treatment program that includes treatment of the SUD and the mental health illness,” said Katie Stout.

Evidence-based treatment for co-occurring disorders includes: motivational interviewing, mindfulness based therapy, trauma informed therapy and 12 step facilitation.

Gateway is a recognized leader among behavioral health care providers in offering substance use disorder treatment, as well as treatment for individuals that are diagnosed with a co-occurring mental illness. To learn more about our treatment programs visit us at RecoverGateway.org.

A Note of Appreciation for the Hospital Worker

Portrait Of Medical Staff Standing In Lobby Of Hospital

In recognition of National Hospital Week, Gateway  expresses sincere gratitude for all hospital workers.

A stay in the hospital can be scary and let’s be honest, unpleasant to even think about. It’s the hospital workers who change this to a more pleasant experience.  The teamwork of a hospital’s clinical and support workers is essential for the healing of a patient. It could be the doctor with the great bedside manner, the social worker who took the time to listen, or the custodian that made sure your window was clean and clear so that you could see the sunshine; all of these people made an impact on your experience.

As a healthcare provider in substance use disorder treatment, Gateway recognizes the important role that hospital workers play in assisting with the detection and guidance of patients with a substance use disorder.

“The collaboration we have with hospitals is crucial in our mission of reducing substance use disorders and co-occurring mental health problems through effective and efficient treatment programs. Gateway extends its’ sincere gratitude to all hospital workers for the impact they have in the lives of those persons struggling with mental illness and substance use disorders,” said Dr. Thomas Britton, President and CEO of Gateway Foundation.

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