Gateway Nursing Manager Presents on Medication-Assisted Treatment

James Blasko, nursing manager at Gateway Foundation treatment centers in Pekin, Springfield and Jacksonville, will present on Medication-Assisted Treatment at the Tazewell County Justice Center in Pekin on Thursday, June 28 from 12 to 2 p.m. The first 30 minutes will begin with a lunch, followed by Blasko’s presentation and a question and answer session. In his presentation, Blasko will review the medications and methods used to assist patients suffering with substance use disorder and how these medications address withdrawal symptoms, cravings and detoxification and ultimately save lives.

What is Medication-Assisted Treatment?

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) combines behavioral therapy and medications to treat substance use disorders. Gateway Foundation centers provide MAT as part of a comprehensive program that includes counseling and therapy to help individuals modify their behavior to make better lifestyle changes for long-term success.

MAT is an evidence-based treatment option proven to reduce or eliminate cravings, decrease withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse.

Who is James Blasko?

After spending 16 years in the intensive care unit at a hospital, Blasko took a job with Gateway Foundation treatment center in Springfield and has been with Gateway ever since. He currently serves as the nursing manager for Gateway treatment centers in Springfield, Pekin and Jacksonville. He cites the patients, the family dynamic of the staff, the work he is doing and how many people it is helping as what he loves most about his job at Gateway.

Blasko is no stranger to MAT. He was one of the main forces behind Gateway’s initiative to offer Narcan to patients and their loved ones after treatment.

“I felt very strongly about helping our clients succeed and their families to feel a little more relief about taking them home and knowing if there was a relapse they could save their loved one’s life,” Blasko says.

Blasko’s commitment to patients goes beyond the sites’ walls. When Gateway patients cannot access the facilities in Springfield, he drives 45 minutes to Lincoln to provide it. He picks up medications from CVS and Walgreens for patients who are unable to pick them up. He also administers shots at area jails because MAT has been proven to reduce recidivism.

To learn more or attend the free event, click here.

Biting the Hands that Feed Each Other: Stress and Alcohol

Stressed businesswoman

Your boss wants the project on their desk first thing tomorrow morning. Your rent is due and you’re short, again. You forgot about your anniversary. It’s Monday.

When you finally get home, you have a drink or two to wind down, which isn’t necessarily a problem, not yet. According to Gateway Aurora Executive Director Jim Scarpace, stress-related drinking becomes a problem when someone starts relying on alcohol as a way to self-medicate, when alcohol becomes the only form of stress-relief.

To be clear, stress and anxiety are different from stress and anxiety disorders. We all experience stress and anxiety to a degree. Stress is sometimes even healthy. It tells our body and our brain to react to a threat. It can kick-start our body to fight off an infection or help us perform better under pressure. However, unmanaged and acute or long-term stress can damage our bodies and our minds.

Although alcohol in small doses acts like a stimulant, or a pick-me-up, alcohol is a depressant, meaning it lowers activity of the central nervous system; simply put, it relaxes us. If someone turns to the bottle time and time again under stress, however, they will likely develop an association between the two, a habit, and then a tolerance to its stress-alleviating properties. It will take more alcohol to feel the same level of relief, increasing vulnerability to addiction.

Despite alcohol’s ability to diminish stress, studies have shown it dually extends the negative experience of stressors and decreases alcohol’s positive effects. So the negative emotion associated with that project – still due tomorrow – may be even worse when you present it to your boss the next day.

People in recovery may need to overcome more hurdles to cope with stressors without the help of alcohol. Studies have also indicated people in recovery experience increased rates of relapse in the face of life stressors.

However, finding support and healthy coping mechanisms can reduce alcohol misuse, relapse rates, and stress levels.

Alternative ways to relieve stress:
– Exercise or go for a walk
– Laugh – at a video, TV show, or meme (here’s one to get you started)
– Listen to music
– Journal or craft
– Take a nap
– Spend time with pets or people you love

“If you’re struggling to stop using alcohol and not getting any relief from your coping mechanisms, then you really need to get support through medically assisted treatment or counseling or both,” Scarpace advises, “and that’s where treatment comes in.”

How do you deal with stress? Share your healthy stress relievers with us this month @RecoverGateway on Facebook and Twitter.

Drug Rehab at Gateway Can Involve Medication Assisted Treatment

Expert Insight from Gilbert Lichstein, Program Director, Gateway Chicago West 3 in a Series of 4 Gateway Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers employs evidenced-based practices to create meaningful, individualized treatment programs. We believe there is more than one pathway to recovery so we expose clients to a wide array of treatment methodologies. This series explores some of those methodologies.

Medication Assisted Treatment drug rehab, medication assisted treatment, substance abuse treatemnt, gateway treatment centersGateways’ comprehensive alcohol and drug rehab programs incorporate the ability to provide medication assisted treatment (MAT). MAT can be a valuable tool for effectively decreasing withdrawal symptoms, reducing or eliminating cravings, assisting with detoxification, and reducing the risk of relapse.

Freedom from withdrawal symptoms enables people to begin therapy sooner than later. With their cravings under control, individuals can more easily engage in their alcohol or drug rehab program and are more likely to stay in treatment.

Gateway offers medication assisted treatment in both outpatient drug treatment and inpatient treatment programs. The medications used by Gateway are closely monitored and, the way we use them, are not addictive. Options are available to alleviate various aspects of dependency on opiates, alcohol, benzodiazepine or other substances.

We administer the minimum effective dose and discontinue the use of medications as soon as possible. As with all Gateway methodologies, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to medication assisted treatment. Clients are individually assessed for the suitability and advisability of using MAT and not all are candidates.

We discuss the options with those who are candidates and work closely with them to develop a personalized treatment plan. People are always free to decline the option to use medications. Gateway’s cutting edge use of new medications and evidence-based programming sets us apart from the norm. What we are doing is measurable, and with doctors and psychiatrists on board, our treatment has evolved into a medical model.

Is someone you know is struggling with alcohol or drug use? Gateway Can Help. Don’t wait, call 800-971-HOPE (4673) or visit RecoverGateway.org today.

Medication Assisted Treatment Can be Key Piece in Treating Alcoholism

In recognition of Alcohol Awareness Month, founded by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence in 1987, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers aim to increase public awareness and understanding of alcoholism and the alcohol treatment options available for individuals and families who may need help.

GAteway Treatment Centers, Gateway alcohol and drug treatment

Kerry Henry
Executive Director
Gateway Treatment Centers in Springfield and Pekin

 Kerry Henry, Executive Director, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment in Springfield and Pekin, explains how Medication Assisted Treatment can play a key role in treatment for alcohol use disorders:

Treatment for alcohol use disorder, often referred to as alcoholism or alcohol abuse, calls for a multi-faceted approach that is personalized to the individual. Sometimes this approach includes medication assisted treatment (MAT).

For alcoholics, MAT initially consists of different treatment options that help them through the initial stages of detox withdrawal symptoms. Freedom from these symptoms enables people to participate in therapy sooner than later.

Skeptics of Medicated Assisted Treatment believe that it’s just substituting one drug for another, which is far from the case. The medications Gateway uses are not harmful, are closely monitored, treat symptoms and, the way we use them, are not addictive. We use the minimum effective dose and discontinue their use as soon as possible.

The ability to medically assist people with alcoholism has brought positive changes for those receiving treatment at Gateway. Read Full Article

To learn more about medication assisted treatment for alcoholism, or our free consultation, call Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers today at 800-971-HOPE (4673).

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