Blog Series for Parents: Delayed Adulthood and Substance Use Disorder

blogIt is not uncommon in today’s world to have twenty-somethings living at home, holding off on marriage and family, and exploring many career options. This “delayed adulthood” stirs mixed attitudes among parents. Parents often struggle and feel conflicted in supporting young adults but also encouraging independence and self-sufficiency.

While some parents may be more or less focused on a particular age a child should be “on their own”, most parents agree: The end goal is to raise a self-sufficient adult. Sometimes an adult child may be experiencing some behavioral health issue which may be keeping them home and unsure of their next step.

At Gateway Foundation Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers, many parents reach out for help with a twenty-something who is living at home, unemployed or under employed. Parents worry that their child’s alcohol use or use of other substances is impacting their functioning, success, and happiness.  At this age, some young adults begin to show signs of a developing Substance Use Disorder because this time period in their life is usually filled with significant life changes, increased freedoms, and societal pressures. .

“Young adults we see in a treatment setting often desire independence, stable relationships, educational and career success, and fulfilment of goals and dreams.  When struggling with a Substance Use Disorder, it becomes difficult to see past the next day, and to take meaningful steps forward.  Time slows down, and people feel stuck or even hopeless that their dreams can become reality.” said Bennie Haywood, Program Director at Gateway Foundation.

According to “The Truth About Marijuana: International Statistics” of adults 26 or older who used marijuana before age 15:
62% went on to use cocaine at some point in their lives
9% went on to use heroin at least once
54% made some nonmedical use of mind-altering prescription drugs

“Addiction has an impact on every member of a household. I encourage parents to take an active role and educate themselves first about substance use disorder and then about the types of treatment available,” recommends Bennie Haywood.

You never stop loving and looking after your child, regardless of age.  Help in the launch to adulthood by staying informed. In our next Blog Series for Parents post, we will discuss the signs of addiction and what every parent should know.

Gateway is a recognized leader among behavioral health care providers in offering substance use disorder treatment, as well as treatment for individuals that are diagnosed with a co-occurring mental illness. To learn more about our treatment programs visit us at RecoverGateway.org.

Gateway Supports Safe Passage Initiative Program

Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers is part of a program called Safe Passage Initiative through the Dixon Police Department. The Safe Passage Initiative is a program that allows individuals struggling with heroin addiction to go to the police or sheriff’s department and turn over their drugs and drug equipment without fear of being arrested. Instead, the person is placed directly to treatment. As a treatment partner, Gateway has taken placements at all our northern locations. For more information on the Safe Passage Initiative Program, visit the Dixon Police Department.

News Release from the Dixon Police Department:

“Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police Provides Support to Safe Passage Initiative”

The Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police is providing critical support and backing to the Safe Passage Initiative. This program allows heroin addicts to go to the police or sheriff’s department, turn over their drugs and drug equipment and not fear being arrested.  Instead, the person is placed directly to treatment.  This program was created by Dixon Police Chief Dan iStock_000019204232LargeLangloss and Lee County Sheriff John Simonton.  This is the second program of its kind in the country and the first in Illinois.  Since September 1, the Safe Passage Initiative has placed 56 people directly to treatment.

The program expanded March 1 to include Whiteside County.  This expansion occurred after a Law Enforcement Heroin Summit held by Lee and Whiteside County Law Enforcement Executives.  To date, five people have been placed into treatment through Whiteside County.  Bureau and Putnam counties are expected to become partners soon, and Dixon Chief Danny Langloss is working very closely with Chief Todd Barkalow of the Freeport Police Department and police chiefs from Pontiac and Dwight to create a program in their community.  Chief Langloss said, “Law enforcement agencies are eager to help people suffering from addiction.  This program has given new hope to making a positive difference in people’s lives and reducing drug usage and crime.”

The failure of the State of Illinois to pass a budget has caused significant strain on drug treatment centers across the State, several of which are partners of the Safe Passage Initiative.  Chief Langloss said, “Our treatment partners are being devastated by the State budget crisis.  Some will be forced to close their doors by the end of June if money is not released by the State.”  This money is in the form of grants and contracts the treatment centers have with the State.  One of the treatment partners is owed more than $700,000.  Chief Langloss added, “We have placed more than 15 people with this facility.  If they are forced to close their doors, it will cripple, if not destroy our program.”

Governor Rauner spoke last week at the Illinois Drug Officers Conference in East Peoria, Illinois.  Langloss was one of more than 600 people in attendance.  During his 10-minute speech, Governor Rauner stated that addiction and mental illness were the top two issues facing law enforcement.  He also said the state needs to find ways to keep violent criminals locked up while reducing the number of non-violent criminals in our jails and prisons.  Governor Rauner pledged to support law enforcement and give them the tools they need to be successful.

Lee County Sheriff John Simonton commented on the Governor’s statements: “We completely agree with Governor Rauner.  Addiction and mental illness are two of the most critical issues facing law enforcement throughout our State.  They are leading to overcrowding in our jails and prison system.  The Safe Passage Initiative was created to address this very issue, and we are seeing incredible results.”

Simonton added, “We cannot afford to have more substance abuse and mental health facilities close.  It is devastating our entire system.”

Within the past few months, Lutheran Social Services of Illinois (LSSI) was forced to make major cuts, laying off hundreds of treatment providers and closing a major treatment facility and several sober homes.

Rock Falls Chief Tammy Nelson said, “Illinois is being hit hard by this national heroin epidemic.  Things are only going to get worse.  We need more beds in treatment centers, not fewer.  We all recognize there is a cost to treatment, but the cost is far less than jail, prison, or emergency rooms.”  It is estimated that placing a person in jail or an emergency room is four times more costly than placing them into treatment.  This means if $25 million was put into treatment, it would have cost Illinois tax payers $100 million in jails and emergency rooms.

Recognizing the significance of this critical social issue facing communities across Illinois, ILACP President Frank Kaminski, Chief of Police of the Park Ridge Police Department, and Executive Director Ed Wojcicki of Springfield have pledged the support of the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police.

Chief Kaminski stated, “Police and sheriffs’ departments across our state must have the resources necessary to address the addiction and mental health issues we face on the streets every day.  We applaud Lee and Whiteside counties for this innovative approach.  We are aware of several other cities and counties across Illinois who are modeling approaches like this.  Our association will serve as a voice in Springfield to ensure we have the resources we need to be successful.”

Wojcicki said the Illinois Chiefs will work closely with our elected officials for a successful resolution to this crisis. “They are saving lives in Lee and Whiteside counties,” he said. “They are innovative. So we join them with our concern about the funding that treatment centers need so that all of them can be great partners in the Safe Passage Initiative.”

Source: Dixon Police Department

At Gateway Treatment Centers, we offer customized treatment plans for people who abuse heroin as well as alcohol and other drugs. Our highly qualified substance abuse specialists provide the counseling and skills people need to help rebuild positive connections, improve relationships and identify the triggers that lead to excessive, extended use of a drug like heroin.

If you know someone who is experiencing substance abuse, learn more at RecoverGateway.org or call Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers for a free consultation at 877-505-HOPE (4673).

 

 

Durbin Introduces Bill to Expand Access to Substance Abuse Treatment Under Medicaid

Source: http://www.durbin.senate.gov

2.29.16 – U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) today joined doctors (including those from Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers) and substance abuse treatment clients at Haymarket Center to discuss legislation he is introducing this week that will expand access to treatment for vulnerable populations who currently are not receiving the addiction care they need while the heroin and opioid prescription drug abuse epidemic continues to grow. The Medicaid Coverage for Addiction Recovery Expansion (Medicaid CARE) Act would modify the Medicaid Institutions for Mental Disease (IMD) Exclusion policy—a decades-old Medicaid policy that has had the unintended consequence of limiting treatment for our most at-risk populations.  The measure would allow more than 2,000 additional Illinois Medicaid recipients in Illinois to receive care annually.

 “Too many substance abuse centers do not qualify for Medicaid because of an outdated understanding of addiction, which restricts access to care. Less than 12 percent of Illinoisans in need of substance abuse treatment actually receive it.  That unacceptable treatment rate is hindering our ability to help these individuals turn their lives around and start curtailing this public health epidemic that’s feeding on our state’s youth,” Durbin said. “That’s why I am introducing a bill to change this outdated and ill-advised policy to ensure that patients in need of substance abuse care can get it.”

 Currently, the IMD Exclusion prohibits the use of federal Medicaid financing for care provided to most patients in residential mental health and substance use disorder residential treatment facilities larger than 16 beds. Illinois has 585 residential addiction treatment beds across 15 facilities that are larger than the 16-bed threshold and thus ineligible for Medicaid payments.

Under the Medicaid CARE Act, residential addiction treatment facilities across the nation and here in Illinois would qualify if they:

  • Provide substance use disorder treatment services;
  • Are accredited by a national agency;
  • Have less than 40 beds; and
  • Provide services to adults for up to 60 consecutive days

The legislation also establishes a new $50 million youth grant program to fund inpatient substance abuse treatment to Medicaid beneficiaries younger than 21 in underserved, high-risk and rural communities.

Durbin is introducing the Medicaid CARE Act as the Senate this week begins debate on the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) of 2015—of which Durbin is a cosponsor.  The CARA legislation authorizes grants to help states adopt a comprehensive approach to the opiate crisis that involves law enforcement, the criminal justice system, the public health system and the recovery support community

The bill would:

  • Require the establishment of a federal interagency task force to develop best practices for pain management and pain medication prescribing;
  • Require a national drug awareness campaign on the risks of opioid abuse;
  • Authorize the Justice Department, in coordination with other federal agencies like the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to make grants to states, locals, and non-profits to:
    • expand education campaigns and prevention strategies to combat opiate abuse;
    • fund treatment alternatives to incarceration for addicts;
    • provide training for first responders for naloxone use;
    • make grants to help develop disposal sites for unwanted prescription drugs;
    • fund heroin and methamphetamine law enforcement task forces
    • implement medication-assisted treatment programs;
    • provide for school-based programs to support recovery from substance abuse;
    • expand education opportunities for offenders in jails or juvenile detention facilities
    • expand family-based substance abuse treatment programs, and expand services for pregnant substance abusers and those with young children;
    • support veterans treatment courts

Illinois experienced 1,652 overdose deaths in 2014 – a nearly 30 percent increase since 2010. Forty percent of those deaths were associated with heroin. Illinois is ranked number one in the nation for a decline in treatment capacity between 2007 and 2012 – and is now ranked the third worst in the country for state-funded treatment capacity.

Nationally, the number of deaths from heroin overdoses more than tripled since 2010. Yet according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, less than 12 percent of the 21.5 million Americans suffering with a substance use disorder received specialty treatment in 2014.

Durbin was joined at today’s announcement by doctors from the Haymarket Center and the Gateway Foundation.  The Haymarket Center is the largest substance use and mental health disorder treatment facility in Chicago.  Founded in 1975, it is one of the only treatment centers in the state that offers all levels of care as defined by the American Society of Addictions Medicine.  Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment was founded in 1968 and is the largest provider of substance abuse treatment in Illinois, with locations throughout the state. 

Emerging Teen Drug Trends and Treatment Options

teen drug trendsKeeping teenagers drug and alcohol free can be an especially difficult challenge parents face. There are many emerging teen drug trends they need to be aware of.

For example, the heroin epidemic sweeping the country is primarily among middle and upper class 18 to 22-year-olds. Coroner officials reported there were 29 heroin-related deaths in Lake County, Illinois alone last year. With many heroin users, their first experience with drugs is a prescription pain reliever provided by their very own doctor.

Teenagers with an opioid-based prescription are three times more likely to wind up misusing these drugs after high school, according to the Michigan study. Many of them turn to heroin when prescription drugs become too expensive or unavailable.

Parents also need to watch out for the use of synthetic marijuana, a dangerous and unpredictable product that many teens believe to be a legal and “natural” alternative to real marijuana.

This includes information on the signs and symptoms of teen drug use, teen drug trends, effects of drug use on developing brains, tips for talking to your teen about drugs and alcohol.

Concerned parents can also visit RecoverGateway.org to access free information on prevention and treatment. To talk to our treatment specialists about teen drug or alcohol treatment options throughout Illinois, including Lake County, call our 24-Hour helpline at 877-505-HOPE (4673). With more than 45 years of experience treating teens and adults, Gateway is here to help.

Drugged Driving Becoming More Prevalent Than Drunk Driving

National Impaired Driving Prevention Month to Focus on Growing Epidemic

drunk driving drugged drivingDecember is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month and also the time of year for holiday parties, family gatherings and travel. During this time, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers wants to provide a reminder of the risks associated with driving under the influence of alcohol as well as drugs – not just illicit drugs, but prescription and over the counter medications too.

Unfortunately, many people have the misconception that driving under the influence of alcohol is worse than driving while impaired by substances such as marijuana or prescription medication.

“There has been a reduction in drinking and driving due to decades of concerted efforts between local, state and federal governments, safety advocates and law enforcement,” said Gateway President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Britton. “During National Impaired Driving Prevention Month, Gateway wants to continue to highlight drunk driving issues, while also exercising the same vigilance towards the issue of drugged driving.”

As the overall number of drivers killed in motor vehicle crashes in the United States declines, the percentage of drugged drivers involved in these accidents increases. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) 2013-2014 National Roadside Survey, more than 22 percent of drivers tested positive for illegal, prescription or over-the-counter drugs.

The spike in the percentage of drugged drivers is concerning, and in recent years, safety advocates and political figures, including the President of the United States, have done their part to emphasize this topic.

In his 2014 National Impaired Driving Prevention Month Presidential Proclamation, President Barack Obama stated that his administration is working to keep drugged drivers off the road and help bolster law enforcement officials’ ability to identify drug-impaired drivers.

“One of the first steps to overcoming this drugged driving epidemic is to educate the public about substance abuse and treatment options,” said Britton. “Efforts like National Impaired Driving Prevention Month help bring these issues to the forefront and provide Gateway with an opportunity to educate.”

Learn more about the effects of drug abuse and addiction>

Kane County Cougars “Pitch in” to Help Gateway!

GAteway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers

Gateway’s Fox Valley drug treatment center receives the charitable proceeds from this season’s Kane County Cougars “Pitch in for Charity” promotion. L to R: Jamie Horner, L.S.W., C.A.D.C., Counselor, Gateway Aurora, Sherman Fields, “Ozzie,” Kane County Cougars’ Mascot, Jim Scarpace, Executive Director, Gateway Aurora

Gateway’s Alcohol & Drug Treatment Center in the Fox Valley area has been chosen to receive the charitable proceeds from this season’s Kane County Cougars “Pitch in for Charity” promotion. “Pitch in for Charity” is a contest held before the fireworks following select Cougars baseball games and involves fans who purchase and throw numbered tennis balls onto a target to win prizes.

“The significance of the donation is twofold” said  Jamie Horner, L.S.W., C.A.D.C., Counselor, Gateway Aurora,  explaining that people often face financial limitations even if they have insurance coverage. “I am so happy that Gateway Aurora will use this donation to assist individuals in covering costs to enter recovery homes after they complete our treatment programs,” said Jamie.

Second, substance abuse treatment is often overlooked when companies choose to donate to a not-for-profit organization. “Often times, organizations are uncomfortable donating to substance abuse treatment centers due to the stigma associated with addiction and mental illness. This donation helps reduce that stigma.” Jamie said.

In her role as a counselor at Gateway’s Fox Valley drug treatment center, Jamie had discussed her passion for helping people recover and Gateway’s mission many times with her dad, Sherman Fields. Through his affiliation with the Kane County Cougars, Mr. Fields recommended Gateway for the “Pitch in for Charity” promotion because he is not only proud of his daughter’s work, he respects the good work performed by Gateway Treatment Centers.

Drug Rehab at Gateway Can Involve Medication Assisted Treatment

Expert Insight from Gilbert Lichstein, Program Director, Gateway Chicago West 3 in a Series of 4 Gateway Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers employs evidenced-based practices to create meaningful, individualized treatment programs. We believe there is more than one pathway to recovery so we expose clients to a wide array of treatment methodologies. This series explores some of those methodologies.

Medication Assisted Treatment drug rehab, medication assisted treatment, substance abuse treatemnt, gateway treatment centersGateways’ comprehensive alcohol and drug rehab programs incorporate the ability to provide medication assisted treatment (MAT). MAT can be a valuable tool for effectively decreasing withdrawal symptoms, reducing or eliminating cravings, assisting with detoxification, and reducing the risk of relapse.

Freedom from withdrawal symptoms enables people to begin therapy sooner than later. With their cravings under control, individuals can more easily engage in their alcohol or drug rehab program and are more likely to stay in treatment.

Gateway offers medication assisted treatment in both outpatient drug treatment and inpatient treatment programs. The medications used by Gateway are closely monitored and, the way we use them, are not addictive. Options are available to alleviate various aspects of dependency on opiates, alcohol, benzodiazepine or other substances.

We administer the minimum effective dose and discontinue the use of medications as soon as possible. As with all Gateway methodologies, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to medication assisted treatment. Clients are individually assessed for the suitability and advisability of using MAT and not all are candidates.

We discuss the options with those who are candidates and work closely with them to develop a personalized treatment plan. People are always free to decline the option to use medications. Gateway’s cutting edge use of new medications and evidence-based programming sets us apart from the norm. What we are doing is measurable, and with doctors and psychiatrists on board, our treatment has evolved into a medical model.

Is someone you know is struggling with alcohol or drug use? Gateway Can Help. Don’t wait, call 800-971-HOPE (4673) or visit RecoverGateway.org today.

Gateway Names Thomas Britton as New President and CEO

Thomas P. Britton, President and CEO, Effective May 13, 2015, Gateway Treatment Centers

Thomas P. Britton, President and CEO, Effective May 13, 2015, Gateway Treatment Centers

Chicago-based Gateway Foundation, Inc. announces today that its Board of Directors named Dr. Thomas P. Britton as the company’s next President and Chief Executive Officer, effective May 13, 2015. Britton, (45) replaces outgoing President and CEO Michael J. Darcy (66), whose retirement was announced in July 2014.

“From the start, we knew finding a replacement for a CEO who had demonstrated exemplary leadership for three decades would not be an easy task,” says Glenn Baer Huebner, Chair of the Board, Gateway Foundation. “Our search was intense yet ultimately gave us the privilege of meeting a number of exceptionally talented individuals. In the end, the board concluded that Dr. Britton is the best person to propel Gateway’s strategic growth and maintain our strong reputation for delivering quality addiction treatment services in a variety of settings, thanks to his requisite drive, clinical expertise and demonstrated business acumen,” adds Huebner. Read More>

Confident in the board of director’s choice, current CEO Michael J. Darcy retiring on June 30, 2015, states, “I look forward to assisting Tom in making a successful transition into his role with Gateway. I’m confident his skillset and commitment to the field of addiction treatment will further the mission and strategic plans of Gateway Foundation.”

Read More> 

For more information about Gateway Foundation, visit RecoverGateway.org.

Gateway Expert Comments on Powdered Alcohol or ‘Palcohol’

powdered alcohol, palcoholA Columbia Chronicle article states that “While powdered alcohol could conceivably be sold in Chicago this summer, legislators, mirroring the concerns of health professionals, are working to keep this from happening. The state legislature is considering  a bill that would make its use a crime.

Gateway’s Substance Abuse Treatment Expert, Paul Getzendanner comments on powdered alcohol:

“The risks so clearly outweigh the benefits,” said Paul Getzendanner, program director for Gateway Foundation, an alcohol and drug treatment center in Chicago. “The creator of Palcohol says that you can take it camping because it is lighter, which is a limited need and catered to a very specific audience.”

Getzendanner said, “The sale and invention of alcohol is another way for distributors to profit off an idea and that the product is targeted to underage drinkers.”

View Full Article from the Columbia Chronicle

Source: Columbia College, Columbia Chronicle

Drug Treatment Center Spotlight: Gateway Chicago River North

Substance Abuse Treatment at Gateway Chicago River North

Substance Abuse Treatment at Gateway Chicago River North

Gateway’s Chicago River North center specializes in providing outpatient substance abuse treatment programs that can help you, or someone you love get life back on track. Our experienced team helps you understand substance abuse, guides you to recovery and supports you every step of the way.

The clinical team at Chicago River North is committed to understanding each person’s unique needs and circumstances and developing a personalized treatment plan that’s right for them. Our goal is to understand and treat the underlying causes of one’s substance abuse, not just their addiction to drugs or alcohol.

Convenient Care Close To Work & Home

Our convenient evening hours let individuals receive treatment without missing work or other daily commitments. Gateway Chicago River North is located near the Merchandise Mart and is less than a 20-minute walk from Union Station and Ogilvie transportation centers. Convenient to Public Transportation:

  • Merchandise Mart (Brown Line, Purple Line)
  • Clinton/Lake (Green Line, Pink Line)
  • Clark/Lake (Blue Line subway)
  • State/Grand (Red Line subway)

Interested in Substance Abuse Treatment at Chicago River North? Call our 24 hour helpline at  800-971-HOPE (4673) or visit Recovergateway.org/ChicagoRiverNorth.

%d bloggers like this: