Appreciate a Social Worker: Social Worker Appreciation Month

Young Woman Having Counselling SessionMarch is National Professional Social Work Month as recognized by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). According to the NASW our nation has more than 600,000 social workers, yet many people still misunderstand who social workers are and the invaluable contributions they bring to society.

Social workers are responsible for helping individuals, families, and groups of people to cope with problems they’re facing in their lives. Being a social worker is often a challenging, yet gratifying career.

As a part of this role, social workers regularly encounter individuals and families affected by substance use disorders (SUDs). Social workers must be knowledgeable about the dynamics of substance use, dependency, and recovery.

Working with clients with SUDs, a social worker must possess specialized knowledge and understanding of psychological and emotional factors, physiological issues, legal considerations, and the co-occurrence of mental health disorders that can coincide with substance use.

“Gateway’s collaboration with the social work profession is key in ensuring that our clients receive the highest quality of coordinated care,” said Katie Stout, Executive Director at Gateway Foundation in Carbondale, IL. “Social workers are instrumental to the evidence-based treatment offered by our programs.”

Social workers begin at the frontline of treatment continuum and are the advocate for their client. As part of this advocacy social workers help their clients gain access to the proper resources and treatment; from start to finish.

Please join Gateway in celebrating this month by honoring a social worker today!

Gateway Treatment Centers Offers Two Free CEU Webinars: “Understanding Addiction: Why Can’t Those Affected Just Say No”

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Addiction has a stigma attached to it, causing many to blame the struggling individual for their problems and assume that they should just be able to stop using if they want to. But the effects of substance use can change the chemistry of the brain, making the task of “Just Saying No” seem inaccessible.

This February, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers will offer two free webinars “Understanding Addiction: Why Can’t Those Affected Just Say No?” giving participants the opportunity to earn one continuing education unit (CEU) and learn about the brain processes that develop under the grips of addiction.

The webinar presenter is A’nna Jurich, LCPC, a Program Director at Gateway Treatment Centers. A’nna has worked with Gateway since 1994 and has worked as a clinician in addictions and mental health for the past 24 years. She is trained in Motivational Interviewing and EMDR.

Because of the way drugs work in the brain, addiction can form, causing compulsive behavior and a lack of control over seeking and taking the drug. “Addiction is a lifelong, chronic disease that affects millions of individuals. The more understanding and acceptance we are able to gain, the better prepared we are to treat and support those who suffer,” Jurich said.

The webinar will be offered on two occasions: Wednesday February 15th, 2017 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and Thursday February 23rd, 2017 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Participants can receive one CEU – NAADAC, Illinois: LCSW, LSW, LCPC, LPC, Nursing, Psychologist, IAODAPCA (Counselor I, Preventionist I, CARS I, MISA I, PCGC II, CCJP II, CAAP I, CRSS II, MAATP I, NCRS II, CFPP II)

For more details regarding the webinar, please visit Recovergatway.org/Training.

Registration in advance is required and space is limited.

 

CEU Webinar to Increase Understanding of the Relationship between Trauma and Addiction

In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month in May, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers will offer a free continuing education (CEU) webinar for healthcare professionals.

The webinar, “Dual Recovery fromTutor with class of students Trauma and Addiction,” will give participants the opportunity to earn one CEU and learn how to identify signs of trauma-infused personalities and how and when to intervene.

The Webinar presenter is Dr. John Fusco, Psy.D., M.Div., a Licensed Clinical Psychologist at Gateway Treatment Centers. Dr. Fusco trains and supervises psychology students to provide diagnostic testing, biofeedback and individual, group and family psychotherapy in an inpatient addictions program for adolescents and adults with mental health related issues.

“Past and current traumas have a ripple effect over decades in the lives of individuals,” Fusco said. “These traumas account for much if not most of a person’s difficulties in living, anxiety, depression as well as inefficient and ineffective coping strategies, including  the use of substances of addiction.”

The webinar will be offered on two occasions: Wednesday, May 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and Tuesday, May 24 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Participants can receive one CEU IAODAPCA, NAADAC, Illinois: LCPC, LPC, LCSW, LSW, Nursing, Psychologist.

Registration in advance is required at RecoverGateway.org/training and space is limited.

“The trauma infused personality is a syndrome of troubling thoughts, feelings and behaviors which go down to the marrow of a person’s psychological bones. It impacts almost everything about a person’s relationships, view of self and view of the world,” Fusco said.

Other areas to be discussed include coping mechanisms, stages of recovery and appropriate interventions for each stage.

To learn more about this training, visit  RecoverGateway.org/training.

Gateway Featured in ABC News Segment: “Fentanyl deaths spike in Chicago area”

Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers was featured in an ABC News segment addressing the spike in fentanyl deaths in the Chicago area. According to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office, more than 100 deaths last year were attributed to new varieties of fentanyl.

Gateway is here to help individuals struggling with opioid addiction by offering customized treatment plans and providing highly qualified substance abuse specialists.

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Photo Credit: ABC News

 

ABC News Article: “FENTANYL DEATHS SPIKE IN CHICAGO AREA”

Chicago area public health officials are grappling with an increase in deaths due to overdoses of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid.

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Photo Credit: ABC News

On Monday, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office reported a sharp increase in fentanyl-related deaths. They join officials in Will and DuPage counties who are also troubled by more overdoses related to strong new batches of fentanyl.

Now, a new FBI campaign hopes to education people about the threat.

Fentanyl is a drug commonly used for surgeries and post-operative care. The drug is in the family of opioids, which includes morphine and heroin.

At Gateway Treatment Centers in Naperville, patient service representatives take calls around the clock. Most of their concerns are opioid addiction.

“We know treatment works, but if we can’t get people to treatment it’s really hard to help them change their behavior as well as their use of medicines,” said Jim Scarpace, executive director of Gateway Aurora.

Making the heroin epidemic worse is the use of synthetic drugs such as fentanyl.

“Fentanyl is something that we use during surgery or during procedures,” said Dr. Steven Aks, of Stroger Hospital of Cook County. “It’s routinely used in the hospital every day. It is an ultra-potent pain medication.”

Staff at Stroger Hospital of Cook County in Chicago also have seen increases in fentanyl overdoses – some of them fatal.

More than 100 deaths last year are attributed to new varieties of fentanyl, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office.

“We really started seeing a big spike back in September. We had one day where we had nine victims come in at once,” Aks said.

Efforts to prevent opioid use now coming from a partnership with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.

The federal agencies will premiere their new documentary in the Chicago area at Westmont High School on Wednesday.

WATCH: Clips of FBI/DEA documentary about opiate addiction

However, John Roberts – whose son Billy Roberts died of a heroin overdose — worries that new, powerful illegal opioids will lead to more grieving families.

“If anybody were to take a pure dose of fentanyl, it would kill them on the spot,” Roberts said.

After Billy Roberts died seven years ago, his father started Heroin Epidemic Relief Organization (H.E.R.O).

“Until I join my little boy, I will fight this battle until that day,” Roberts said.

Treatment experts suspect those using heroin may mistake fentanyl as heroin, but the drug is much more powerful and can take several does of the antidote to revive a patient.

Anyone concerned about a loved one can now be trained and get naloxone from a pharmacy or recovery advocacy organizations.

H.E.R.O. is hosting an event on April 29 at Edwards Hospital in Naperville.

Source: ABC News

Are you concerned a loved one may be addicted to opioids? Learn more about prescription drug abuse online at RecoverGateway.org or call Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers for a free consultation at 877-505-HOPE (4673).

 

Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders: Is There a Correlation?

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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, organized by the National Eating Disorders Association, began on Sunday, Feb. 21. The week seeks to bring about awareness of the dangers of eating disorders, and to challenge the way the public perceives these illnesses.

The goal of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (#NEDAwareness) is to put the spotlight on eating disorders and improve public understanding of their causes, dangers and treatments. Millions of people across the country suffer from eating disorders, and by increasing awareness and access to resources, we can encourage early detection and intervention. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder, so early intervention can mean saving lives.

Co-Occurring Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders

In honor of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment aims to help individuals understand the connection between eating disorders and substance abuse.

Substance use and eating disorders have strong correlations starting at development. Both diseases are influenced by genetic, biological, environmental and psychological factors and can develop before, during, or after treatment for an eating disorder. For some individuals, substance use may cause appetite suppression leading to significant weight loss that can trigger the onset of an eating disorder. For others, it can be relied upon for avoidance-based coping.

According to the National Eating Disorder Association, nearly 50% of individuals with an eating disorder are also abusing substances such as drugs and/or alcohol.

These two diseases feed upon each other and intensify the destructive qualities of one another. This in turn creates a vicious cycle for the person suffering being that one disorder cannot be treated without treating the other.

If you know someone who has an eating disorder and is also abusing substances, seek treatment and determine if they are equipped in treating individuals with this specific co-occurring disorder.

Sources:
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org
www.eatingdisorderhope.com

Emerging Teen Drug Trends and Treatment Options

teen drug trendsKeeping teenagers drug and alcohol free can be an especially difficult challenge parents face. There are many emerging teen drug trends they need to be aware of.

For example, the heroin epidemic sweeping the country is primarily among middle and upper class 18 to 22-year-olds. Coroner officials reported there were 29 heroin-related deaths in Lake County, Illinois alone last year. With many heroin users, their first experience with drugs is a prescription pain reliever provided by their very own doctor.

Teenagers with an opioid-based prescription are three times more likely to wind up misusing these drugs after high school, according to the Michigan study. Many of them turn to heroin when prescription drugs become too expensive or unavailable.

Parents also need to watch out for the use of synthetic marijuana, a dangerous and unpredictable product that many teens believe to be a legal and “natural” alternative to real marijuana.

This includes information on the signs and symptoms of teen drug use, teen drug trends, effects of drug use on developing brains, tips for talking to your teen about drugs and alcohol.

Concerned parents can also visit RecoverGateway.org to access free information on prevention and treatment. To talk to our treatment specialists about teen drug or alcohol treatment options throughout Illinois, including Lake County, call our 24-Hour helpline at 877-505-HOPE (4673). With more than 45 years of experience treating teens and adults, Gateway is here to help.

Gateway Carbondale’s Executive Director Shares Concern Regarding Suicide Rates in Southern Illinois

Suicide is a Growing Concern

In the wake of recent suicides in Southern Illinois, especially Franklin and Williamson counties we realize our communities are not alone.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the rate of suicide in the U.S. is the highest it has been in 25 years. It is among the top ten causes of death in the U.S., and the only cause within the top ten that has increased.[1]

Some researchers believe an important contributing factor to this rise is the surge in the abuse of prescription painkillers. Others point to our improved ability to manage health conditions, yet still inferior inability to manage mental health.[2]

Suicide and Substance Abuse Are Often Related

Many people are unaware of the high correlation between suicide and substance abuse. According to Psychologytoday.com, 45 percent of patients with untreated substance abuse disorders commit suicide. It is suicide and substance abuse, drug abusealso telling that 24 percent of suicide victims in the United States are legally drunk when they commit suicide.[3] At the Gateway center in Carbondale these statistics seem on target – we work with individuals whose use of drugs and alcohol have contributed to negative life factors that may become so severe as to lead to suicide.

Did you know it’s not uncommon for people to have a mental health issue that exists in tandem with their drug use? At Gateway, we see a high level of depression alongside of addictions, particularly with alcohol. Such situations can become cyclical where, as the depression or anxiety becomes increasingly severe, the person tries to manage it with more alcohol, opiates or other substances.

When treating individuals who manifest signs of having mental health and substance abuse issues (known as having co-occurring disorders), a multi-pronged, individualized approach to intervention is recommended. Otherwise, the risk of either or both disorders reoccurring is much higher.

Taking Action

The topic of suicide is not one that is generally talked about and most people don’t understand it or its connection to mental illness and substance abuse. Fortunately, progress is being made in the realm of scientific research towards potential interventions, medications and psychotherapies targeted specifically at reducing suicide.[4] Efforts such as these, combined with national awareness-raising efforts and those throughout southern Illinois, provide hope that members of our community may find the ability to address suicide in more meaningful ways.

We are saddened by the tragedy of the suicides that have occurred over the past several months, and would like to remind our community that Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Center in Carbondale is available to provide information and support. We encourage you to take advantage of our no-cost resources such as free consultations, online resources and a family guide.

If you or someone you love are experiencing feelings of depression, anxiety or other issues that may become overwhelming, know that help is available via suicide hotlines such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. If drugs or alcohol are also involved, please don’t hesitate to call Gateway’s 24-hour hotline 877-505 HOPE (4673).

Lori Dammermann
Executive Director
Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Carbondale

[1] http://www.usnews.com/news/newsgram/articles/2014/10/08/us-suicides-hit-highest-rate-in-25-years

[2] Ibid.

[3] DrugFree.org

[4] http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2015/03/suicide-insel

National Suicide Prevention Month in September: Suicide and Substance Abuse

In Honor of National Suicide Prevention Month in September and World Suicide Prevention Day on September 10th, Gateway aims to educate individuals on the relationship between suicide ans substance use disorders:

Article Written by Dr. Greg Tierney, Program Supervisor, Gateway Alcohol & Drug Treatment Centers

Suicide and Substance Abuse: Is There a Connection?

After depression, substance use disorders are the most common risk factors of suicide. Based on findings from psychological autopsies, 90% of those who complete suicide have one or more diagnosable psychiatric disorders at the time of death.

Roughly 1 in 3 people who commit suicide have substance use disorder.For those with a Substance Use Disorder, over 20% also have a diagnosed Depressive Disorder. The co-occurrence of these disorders relate to higher risk of suicide, greater functional impairment, and risk of having additional psychiatric conditions. The development and escalation of a substance use issue brings about consequences in all areas of an individual’s life.

Increasingly severe use of drugs or alcohol can cause losses such as losing a job, divorce, legal and financial problems, health issues, and others. Therefore, as a substance use issue becomes more severe, the rate of diagnosable Depressive Disorders increases significantly. Of the individuals entering substance abuse treatment, 40% have a Co-occurring Depressive Disorder.

Read Full Article at  RecoverGateway.org/Suicide

Dual Diagnosis in Drug Rehab is More Common than You May Think

Expert Insight from Gilbert Lichstein, Program Director, Gateway Chicago West

4 in a Series of 4

Gateway Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers employs evidenced-based practices to create meaningful, personalized treatment programs. We believe there is more than one pathway to recovery so we expose clients to a wide array of treatment methodologies. This series explores some of those methodologies.

Dual Diagnosis in Drug Rehab

dual diagnosis and drug rehabThe Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) states that 80% of individuals with addiction issues have a co-occurring Axis 1 mental health issue, also known as a dual diagnosis. Axis 1 disorders include depression, mania, excessive anxiety and psychosis.

One of Gateway’s distinguishing features is the depth with which we are able to address both issues. Upon arriving at Gateway, clients are given a comprehensive assessment. Should they be found to have both a substance abuse and an Axis 1 mental health issue, they are admitted to our dual-diagnosis unit.

Treating both diagnoses simultaneously truly helps the person free themselves from a destructive cycle, which greatly enhances the likelihood of successful treatment. Gateway’s personalized drug rehab plans address each individual’s specific needs.

Another unique aspect of Gateway’s methodology is our dual diagnosis group, which is offered in inpatient treatment. Individuals in treatment may also elect to involve family and loved ones in their recovery by participating in our family group component.

It’s very important to Gateway that our systems and staff reduce the stigmas that may be attached to substance abuse or a mental health disorder. We value a shame-free approach to treatment and want people to feel like themselves; like they are thriving rather than just getting by. Given the appropriate support, knowledge and skill building, clients are able to recover.

The dual diagnosis program at Gateway is measurable, using established tools that help us to assess, reassess and continually strengthen integrated treatment within our programs. This and many other features contribute to making Gateway a recognized leader among behavioral health providers offering substance abuse treatment as well as dual diagnosis treatment.

Prescription Drug Abuse and the Road to Heroin

Prescription drug abuse is a growing trend.
heroin abuse, prescription drurug treatmenway foundation, gateway alcohol and drug treatment centers, gateway alcohol and drug treatmentFollowing marijuana and alcohol, prescription and over-the-counter drugs have become the most commonly abused substances by Americans 14 and older.*

The process of becoming dependent on prescription drugs can begin easily and often, innocently. “Sometimes, people don’t finish their medication and might give it away to others who appear to need it, or the person’s children or other family members may come across it,” explains Carl Scroggins, Overdose Prevention Programs Supervisor at Gateway.

Link to Heroin
Research now shows addiction to prescription opioids such as Vicodin and Oxycontin may open the door to heroin abuse. Making the transition from one to the other is frequently a matter of economics and accessibility: The cost of prescription pills is $20 to $60, while the easier to access heroin sells for $3 to $10 a bag.

In the past five years, heroin use has increased by 75 percent** No longer a predominantly urban issue, heroin abuse has mushroomed in the Chicago suburbs, Springfield and throughout Central Illinois.

Read Full Article>

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